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Sweetest Reggae

Reggae legend Ken Parker - SpotifyThrowbacks.com

Song: Hope Your Satisfied

Artist: Ken Parker

Album: Hope Your Satisfied (c. 1965)

Genre: Reggae

I have got to say that, Jamaican reggae singer Ken Parker, has got to be one of my most favorite old-time reggae legends, forgotten reggae legends! In my opinion, he made some of the most beautiful romantic reggae music. Ken grew up in the church, and started his career singing religious reggae music. I mostly gravitated more towards his love songs, such as “Hope Your Satisfied.” I also absolutely loved his cover of Sam Cooke’s “Change Gonna Come.” Damn!! That’s a sweet reggae gem right there! It appears that a lot of his oldies have been digitally re-released, so I am unsure or the original publishing dates for these songs. Oooh, oooh, you’ve got to checkout another favorite classic of mine. He did a cover of a song called “Chokin’ Kind,” I believe it was originally performed by American singer Joe Simon. I love both versions of this song.

Reggae legend Marcia Griffiths - SpotifyThrowbacks.com

Song: Don’t Let Me Down

Artist: Marcia Griffiths

Album: Play Me Nice & Sweet (1974)

Genre: Reggae

Wow! Talk about sweet reggae music? This is a great one right here!! I know I probably say this all the time, but, I think this is one of my most favorite reggae songs by a female. “Don’t Let Me Down” is both danceable and very romantic. I highly recommend this song for weddings/reception. Marcia has taken this 1969 Beatles song to a whole different level. Now, to be honest, I’m almost certain that most Americans don’t know anything about Marcia Griffiths. However, Americans may remember her for her smash hit “Electric Boogie (1990).” The crazy thing about this song is that, growing up, this song was almost a requirement to any Black party. I mean, before an end to every barbecue, someone will demand that song to be played. Almost every church function I’ve been to as a child played this song before the function was over. The dance to this song looked very much like “The Bus Stop.” Yet, the Top 100 Charts has this song positioned at #51! WTF??????????

Cynthia Schloss - SpotifyThrowbacks.com

You know, I am absolutely ashamed to find out that there exist people who don’t believe that there is a such thing as a female reggae legend. It’s kind of aggravating to know that (with the exception of female hip hop today (it appears)), there still exist sexist attitudes concerning women in music. As someone who consumes a lot of music since childhood, I emphatically disagree with this sort of mindset. Especially in the area of reggae love songs. Throughout history, no matter where you come from, it’s always been an unsaid standard that romantic songs came from men. But, I’ve heard some of the most beautiful reggae love songs from women. The late Cynthia Schloss was one of them, and she earned the right to be called a reggae legend in my opinion.

The Late Cynthia Schloss Is A Forgotten Legend Of Love Songs!




The late Cynthia Schloss was very beautiful, and had a smooth delicate singing voice. The first song I think I can recall hearing from her, was a song called “Send Me The Pillow (c. 1982).” The song was actually written by a guy named Johnny Tillotson sometime in the very late 50s. “Send me the pillow that you dream on. Maybe time will let our dreams come true.” Rarely have I heard lyrics like these, that are so sweet and genuine. There’s another song I think you should hear called “Looks Like Love (1983).” Both my late grandparents played this song A LOT!! Many of Cynthia’s music is probably far too mellow for today’s young listeners. However, they’re notable music that is part of both Jamaican and American unknown music history.

Album: From Bam-Bam To Cherry Oh! Baby - SpotifyThrowbacks.com

Song: Bam-Bam

Artist: Toots & The Maytals, Byron Lee & The Dragons

Album: From Bam-Bam To Cherry Oh! Baby (c. 1970s)

Genre: Sweet Reggae

This may sound very arrogant…. But…. In this day and age, the only people who can probably appreciate an album like this, are Jamaicans and West-Indians in my age group. Very few Americans would know anything about this album; unless perhaps you’ve dated someone for many years who happened to be from the island. One of the things I miss most from my childhood growing up was, in my neighborhood, we had one of the only record shops dedicated to 100% reggae! Both full albums and 12 inch reggae; many if not all were imported. All in a very short walking distance. I remembered this album being one of many my mom purchased there. I think this was when I fell in love with Toots and The Maytels’s music for the first time.

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The first song I heard was “Bam-Bam” by Toots & The Maytels. I loved this song so much. I don’t know what was it that I loved it so much. Maybe it was his unique voice? Maybe it was his soul that came through his music? Or maybe it was his passion for political change I heard in his music? I played that song so many times. The second song I fell in love with was “Pomps & Pride.” Very catchy tune, and you can’t help but to move your hips just a little bit when you hear it. I was really surprised to find out that Spotify has the entire entire album. The album has various artists, which includes Desmond Dekker (which is another talented favorite of mine.


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Slim Smith - SpotifyThrowbacks.com

Song: Will You Still Love Me

Artist: Slim Smith

Album: Sound Box Essentials: Platinum Edition (2012)

Genre: Sweet Reggae

This is a very nice reggae cover of an old 1960s song, originally first recorded by a girl group called “The Shirelles.” The very popular group Shirelles took this song to #1, and has been covered by many people after that. But very few are aware of this reggae gem. Born in Jamaica, Slim Smith has done a wonderful job with this legendary classic. Unfortunately, early in Smith’s reggae career, he accidentally killed himself. He died in 1973 from subsequent injuries. I cannot find the year he actually released this recording. I’m going to make an assumption it was a couple of years before his death.


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The late John Holt - SpotifyThrowbacks.com

Today, I’d like to write about one of the biggest forgotten reggae legends! His name? The late John Holt. This man has made a lot of smooth reggae. Sweet, sweet reggae. He also used to be one of many Jamaican artists that loved to reinterpret American music; and let me tell you, many of them were really nice in my opinion. I didn’t like all his remakes, sometimes it sounded like his voice didn’t fit some of the songs he sang. But, there was one cover he did that I remember my grandfather listening to a lot on his reel2reel (I loved it too). This song was co-written by the late Brook Benton (along with two others), and recorded by the late Nat King Cole. The song was called “Looking Back (1958).” The song hit #2 on the R&B Charts.

The late John Holt - SpotifyThrowbacks.com

However, John Holt’s version of “Looking Back 1972),” took the song to a whole different level. I LOVED how he put together that organ intro; it almost made the song immediately recognizable. It’s a beautiful song that talks about a man realizing his bad mistakes toward the one he loves, and he learned not to do them again. You know, I was saddened to discover that Holt’s cover version wasn’t even mentioned anywhere on Wikipedia. If I didn’t know it existed growing up, it would not be on my blog. I digress.. I tried adding him on Wiki, not sure if they’re going to approve it or not. I want you to check out two more amazing Holt songs. “A Love I Can Feel (1971),” and “If It Don’t Work Out,” also released in 1971. “If It Don’t Work Out,” is actually a cover of the Casinos’s  song “Then You Can Tell Me Goodbye (1967).”


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Freddie McGregor - SpotifyThrowbacks.com

One of my favorite songs from whom I consider a reggae legend, his name is Freddie McGregor, and the song is called “Just Don’t Want To Be Lonely (1987).” This was actually a cover of “The Main Ingredient’s” 1974 release. I couldn’t find this particular song on the billboard charts, but I know this was a significant hit because I heard it everywhere. Then again, I have to remember the community I was in. Growing up, we had a LOT of West-Indian & Jamaican people residing in my neighborhood. I loved the way he did this song.

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REGGAE SUNSPLASH, Freddie McGregor, 1979, (c) International Harmony/courtesy

Maybe I should point out that McGregor does have about 3 whole albums that registered on the charts. The problem is with music streaming, you’re not always guaranteed that all the songs from the original album would be on that album (largely because of licensing). That makes it tougher to gauge what the hits are. Anyway, another beautiful song McGregor has done is a song called “I Was Born A Winner (1992).” Indeed another brilliant love song from a talented artist. Despite not having more detailed chart information, I happened to stumble upon an article in the Jamaican Observer, that said McGregor is one of a small group of artists who are over 50 years of age, who has made it on the Top 10 Billboard Charts.


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For today, I planned on randomly digging up an album from my collection. But then I heard this classic masterpiece! It totally escaped my mind that there is a reggae cover of this song. How could I have forgotten? This made history in both film and music media. “To Sir With Love (1967),” starring Sidney Poitier, was an UK & USA mega cult classic, that I doubt any of today’s younger generation knows anything about. There’s no surprise that a talented reggae band would eventually reinterpret this song.

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An awesome reggae group called Lynn Taitt & The Jets, done an instrumental cover of the theme song “To Sir, With Love.” Unfortunately, I’m having a bit of trouble finding their original release date, because all that seems to be available is the “digital release dates.” However, I don’t think that it could be younger than c. 1970. Island people of my age bracket are going to love this song (I think). It’s funny, listening to the way Lynn picks his guitar, reminds me a lot of an American group called The Ventures. You know, now that I think about it, it’s weird that as popular as the movie was, I never heard the complete sound track (after all these years). I guess I should look that up. Here is Lulu’s original version of “To Sir, With Love (1967).” Rent the movie if you haven’t already! It’s a tear jerker, but worth it.

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